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Subreddit Stats: Monero top posts from 2019-01-07 to 2020-01-05 20:57 PDT

Period: 363.37 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 32255
Rate (per day) 2.75 88.32
Unique Redditors 413 4359
Combined Score 87276 146123

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 11193 points, 116 submissions: dEBRUYNE_1
    1. 'Monero in many respects is closer to what Bitcoin was intended to be than Bitcoin itself' - binaryFate (245 points, 61 comments)
    2. "It was a huge misstep that Satoshi’s original design has weak privacy. It set in stone an expectation that digital assets must have worse privacy than cash. Didn’t have to be this way." - Udi Wertheimer ‏ (215 points, 61 comments)
    3. 'Privacy should not be optional (and that’s why we made it a default).' - Firefox (214 points, 24 comments)
    4. Monero receives 'not a security' rating (best possible rating) by Crypto Rating Council (joint council created by Coinbase, Kraken, Circle/Poloniex, Bittrex, Paxos/itBit, Cumberland, Genesis and Grayscale) (214 points, 30 comments)
    5. GUI v0.14.1.0 'Boron Butterfly' (with Ledger Nano X and Trezor Model T support) released! (213 points, 243 comments)
    6. 'Apple CEO Tim Cook says privacy isn't a feature that should be built into products after the fact' (212 points, 39 comments)
    7. "you’ve been asking... we finally delivered! $XMR is live in [Exodus] Eden version 19.2.2" (202 points, 68 comments)
    8. The Bitcoin.com Exchange has listed Monero (190 points, 73 comments)
    9. Preliminary information thread regarding the scheduled protocol upgrade of November 30 (183 points, 141 comments)
    10. GUI v0.15.0.1 'Carbon Chamaeleon' released! (177 points, 278 comments)
  2. 3214 points, 41 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Some generous donor(s) topped off ALL of the proposals in funding required! (193 points, 38 comments)
    2. Tentative Monero 0.15 Release Schedule (162 points, 51 comments)
    3. Monero: Monero Adds Blockchain Pruning and Improves Transaction Efficiency (143 points, 23 comments)
    4. Logs from the 2.5 hr dev meeting on Monero's PoW (124 points, 124 comments)
    5. New logo for the Monero Community Workgroup YouTube channel, courtesy of u/anhdres! (119 points, 19 comments)
    6. Announcing the "Beware of Bitcoin" campaign for Mastering Monero (117 points, 98 comments)
    7. Preliminary support for Monero on BTCPayServer has been merged! (116 points, 19 comments)
    8. OpenBazaar dev call tomorrow discussing proof of concept for Monero integration (111 points, 21 comments)
    9. "Linking Anonymous Transactions via Remote Side-Channel Attacks" - Now-Fixed Network Analysis Attacks on Monero and Zcash (102 points, 50 comments)
    10. Monero added to Exodus mobile (100 points, 33 comments)
  3. 3157 points, 32 submissions: OsrsNeedsF2P
    1. Alright everybody pack it up. US Attorney General says encryption creates a security risk; if your wallet requires a password to unlock, you're doing acts that are used by terrorists, and it's time to stop. (317 points, 56 comments)
    2. What a shame Monero isn't included ¯_(ツ)_/¯ (254 points, 47 comments)
    3. Linus Tovalds believes processor vendors are approaching the end of Moore's Law, and optimization of code is going to be needed to increase performance (245 points, 61 comments)
    4. Fluffypony Appreciation Thread (199 points, 62 comments)
    5. IRS wants to subpoena Google, Apple & Microsoft to see if users have downloaded cryptocurrency related applications (190 points, 96 comments)
    6. Soon ™ (151 points, 55 comments)
    7. Privacy matters: Bitpay donations to Hong Kong Free Press not going through (141 points, 20 comments)
    8. IBM, MIT and Elliptic release world’s largest labeled dataset of bitcoin transactions to help identify "Bad Actors" (119 points, 22 comments)
    9. Celebrating 10 years of Tails (114 points, 5 comments)
    10. Former CTO of Purism, the developers of the Librem 5 Linux mobile phone, notes the PR momentum they got with GNOME, Matrix, and Monero (96 points, 12 comments)
  4. 2106 points, 29 submissions: ErCiccione
    1. Church Of Monero: Enough is enough - How the leader of the Church tried to fool the community to make look like the Church is organizing the Monero Konferenco and even adding his own Monero address on the flyer (166 points, 268 comments)
    2. [URGENT]Call for translators! - We have two days to submit as many translations as possible for the next release of the GUI wallet! We need your help! (123 points, 46 comments)
    3. Monero translators, we need you to make one final sprint! The code freeze is imminent. (112 points, 15 comments)
    4. 2 new projects joined the Monero Ecosystem! MoneroBox, a plug-and-play, zero-configuration Monero full node and Monero-Javascript, Monero wallet and daemon JavaScript API (107 points, 12 comments)
    5. PSA: We've posted an announcement regarding the potentially compromised CLI binaries on getmonero.org (101 points, 47 comments)
    6. New language for Monerujo: Esperanto! Will be available in next release (97 points, 6 comments)
    7. Monero Python - A comprehensive Python module for handling Monero cryptocurrency, has officially joined the Monero Ecosystem Project! (94 points, 12 comments)
    8. Getmonero.org is now available in German! (89 points, 16 comments)
    9. Getmonero.org updated: New user friendly download page, Welcome video in Brazilian Portuguese, 5 new merchants accepting Monero and more (76 points, 12 comments)
    10. My last proposal as coordinator of the Localization Workgroup has ended. A recap, some updates, plans for the future of the internationalization of Monero and a huge thanks (73 points, 22 comments)
  5. 1257 points, 14 submissions: xmrhaelan
    1. A response to the Reuters article about Monero (183 points, 28 comments)
    2. CoinDesk research shows Monero is #4 by Reddit post volume community metrics. Kudos to you all! (172 points, 57 comments)
    3. A response to Coinbase regarding their criticism of Monero’s approach to PoW security (171 points, 91 comments)
    4. Graphic idea for Boron Butterfly release, courtesy of Monero Outreach (170 points, 36 comments)
    5. PSA: Seeking Volunteer Reviewers for PoW RandomX (104 points, 55 comments)
    6. PSA: Mine Monero to Support the Network (77 points, 80 comments)
    7. Looking for ways to help, volunteer, or contribute to the Monero community? Look no further! (70 points, 20 comments)
    8. SWOT Analysis of Monero [draft] (59 points, 35 comments)
    9. Monero Konferenco Press Release (55 points, 9 comments)
    10. A Simplified Guide to Monero Wallets, from Monero Outreach (40 points, 9 comments)
  6. 1220 points, 9 submissions: geonic_
    1. Monero is second only to Bitcoin in terms of number of commits for the past 4 years! (269 points, 59 comments)
    2. Joe Weisenthal (Bloomberg): Until true anonymity (or near anonymity) is developed into Bitcoin, it's still incomplete, and not delivering on its promise. Without anonymity, there's no censorship resistance, and no store of value. (173 points, 38 comments)
    3. Nick Szabo puts Monero on an equal footing with Bitcoin: “deeply safe Bitcoin & Monero” (170 points, 41 comments)
    4. Chainalysis: Bitcoin is the most popular cryptocurrency accepted on dark markets, followed by Monero. Dark web spending to reach $1B this year. (150 points, 39 comments)
    5. BTC maximalist QOTD: “If you send me bitcoin, I would prefer if you used coinjoin first. I would prefer to not know the history of your sats. Don't put that liability on me. Thanks.” (142 points, 45 comments)
    6. Peter Todd wishes Bitcoin had perpetual inflation -- 2140 is much closer than you think (101 points, 89 comments)
    7. nopara73, creator of Wasabi Wallet: "Compared to privacy coins Wasabi is just a temporary hack. I think without Confidential Transactions, as the transaction fees grow, privacy will be priced out of Bitcoin's main chain." (95 points, 48 comments)
    8. Scott Stornetta, inventor of the first blockchain: “When I first read the Bitcoin white paper I thought [...] there’s no privacy at all here! What you’ve got is a completely traceable record of what’s going on.” @12:00 (68 points, 17 comments)
    9. Let's discuss: is Monero a privacy tool (i.e. Tor, CoinJoin, etc.) or a secure layer one protocol (https)? how aligned is it with Bitcoin ideologically (consider current vs original Bitcoin ideology)? is Monero's blockchain a temporary solution? (52 points, 27 comments)
  7. 1186 points, 12 submissions: hyc_symas
    1. RandomX Audit Status (148 points, 29 comments)
    2. RandomX Status Update (134 points, 82 comments)
    3. RandomX Audit Status - Final (130 points, 54 comments)
    4. RandomX Audit Status (116 points, 9 comments)
    5. RandomX Audit Status (110 points, 24 comments)
    6. RandomX testnet (99 points, 23 comments)
    7. Blockchain Growth stats (87 points, 26 comments)
    8. RandomX Auditor Selection (86 points, 47 comments)
    9. CCS: RandomX Audit now in Funding Required (78 points, 45 comments)
    10. RandomX Audit Funding Request (76 points, 14 comments)
  8. 1171 points, 13 submissions: Thunderosa
    1. Blend in the Crowd with Carbon Chamaeleon v0.15.0.0 (161 points, 25 comments)
    2. @monero Twitter banner (141 points, 25 comments)
    3. A little Christmas card for my favorite freaks. Happy Holidays! (136 points, 4 comments)
    4. Boron Butterfly ASCII (117 points, 23 comments)
    5. Monero Torch (111 points, 73 comments)
    6. Konferenco funding! (105 points, 19 comments)
    7. supportxmr-gui Update - Twice the features, half the size. All vanilla. (98 points, 15 comments)
    8. Happy 5th (70 points, 16 comments)
    9. Explore the expert speakers and important topics of Monero Konferenco 2019! (57 points, 11 comments)
    10. RandomX - Monero and Arweave to Validate New Proof-of-Work Algorithm (52 points, 12 comments)
  9. 1129 points, 14 submissions: pinkphloid
    1. [NEWS] CAKE WALLET for Monero has crossed 20,000 unique installs on iOS. (123 points, 69 comments)
    2. [PUBLIC BETA] Cake Wallet for Monero is now available on Android! (104 points, 48 comments)
    3. Going to the Monero Konferenco? Don’t miss MoneroTalk’s party Saturday night Casa De Monero! It’s THE party of the weekend! (99 points, 13 comments)
    4. [UPDATE] Cake Wallet version 3.1.7, now with Address book, Back-up to iCloud and other locations, and BCH is back in the exchange! (92 points, 70 comments)
    5. [UPDATE] Cake Wallet version 3.1.17 with Hidden balance mode plus other new useful features! (90 points, 16 comments)
    6. Cake Wallet is hiring! (88 points, 14 comments)
    7. If you like using Cake Wallet, please vote! Thank you 🙏🏼🙏🏼 (87 points, 20 comments)
    8. NYC Monero meetup featuring guest speaker Justin Ehrenhofer of XMR Community Work Group. - by Cake Wallet and Monero Talk (82 points, 10 comments)
    9. [UPDATE] Cake Wallet - Version 3.1.20 Black Forest Cake Edition (73 points, 23 comments)
    10. Cake Wallet (small news) - we have acquired the domain cakewallet.com! (67 points, 16 comments)
  10. 1054 points, 13 submissions: jman76358
    1. Monero receives A rating (194 points, 43 comments)
    2. Exodus Wallet now supports Monero (128 points, 38 comments)
    3. I tell a lot of people about Monero who don't know anything about crypto and they instantly get it. They ask me the same thing over and over, so why do people still use Bitcoin? (127 points, 119 comments)
    4. How trustyworthy is the Cake wallet for iOS? (80 points, 43 comments)
    5. Why don't other coin devs like talking about fungibility? They seem to shrug it off even though it's a necessary component to being a currency. (77 points, 85 comments)
    6. Any idea what's going on with the Official Monero Twitter page? (67 points, 33 comments)
    7. Should Quantum Resistance research for XMR be started soon? I would love to see what the great minds of the dev community could come up with ! (64 points, 55 comments)
    8. The End of Mainstream Privacy is Upon Us (62 points, 28 comments)
    9. Non-KYC exchanges coming to an end, even for small amounts. DEX with Monero as main coin when? (57 points, 18 comments)
    10. I find it funny that people think the gov doesn’t want people to use bitcoin, trust me , they’re estatic that people want to voluntarily be tracked and surveilled. (55 points, 45 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. dEBRUYNE_1 (9070 points, 1572 comments)
  2. OsrsNeedsF2P (5373 points, 757 comments)
  3. hyc_symas (2954 points, 332 comments)
  4. gingeropolous (2345 points, 313 comments)
  5. SamsungGalaxyPlayer (1897 points, 271 comments)
  6. rbrunner7 (1844 points, 299 comments)
  7. spirtdica (1835 points, 544 comments)
  8. pebx (1596 points, 318 comments)
  9. SarangNoether (1244 points, 115 comments)
  10. Same_As_It_Ever_Was (1234 points, 248 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. VLC accepts XMR for donations. Owner has turned down millions to keep it open source and ad-free. by tempMonero123 (468 points, 34 comments)
  2. Monero’s New Mascot by deepdarksea (433 points, 33 comments)
  3. Monero fashion spotted in the wild by Peterb88 (406 points, 34 comments)
  4. Found this in Basel, Switzerland. Then bought 0.968745 with no ID. by _0_1 (395 points, 120 comments)
  5. Bye-bye ASIC's! :-) by TheFuzzStone (357 points, 167 comments)
  6. Art by me by nikitko13 (328 points, 58 comments)
  7. Analysis: More than 85% of the current Monero Hashrate is ASICs and each machine is doing 128 kh/s by MoneroCrusher (324 points, 427 comments)
  8. Hi guys, long time no see 😁 this is what I do when not painting. Tools are printed on 3D printer. by cryptopaintings (322 points, 47 comments)
  9. Alright everybody pack it up. US Attorney General says encryption creates a security risk; if your wallet requires a password to unlock, you're doing acts that are used by terrorists, and it's time to stop. by OsrsNeedsF2P (317 points, 56 comments)
  10. India's ban could be Monero's boon by whotookmycrypto (313 points, 60 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 175 points: MoneroTipsBot's comment in Soon ™
  2. 139 points: MoneroCrusher's comment in Analysis: More than 85% of the current Monero Hashrate is ASICs and each machine is doing 128 kh/s
  3. 132 points: jonaemahina's comment in Kidnappers demand Monero ransom for wife of one of the Richest men in Norway.
  4. 116 points: leonardochaia's comment in Monero's Fluffypony reveals why he stepped down
  5. 111 points: katiecharm's comment in Tax Ramifications of Buying Coffee with Cryptocurrency
  6. 102 points: AlexAnarcho's comment in Kidnappers demand Monero ransom for wife of one of the Richest men in Norway.
  7. 100 points: fluffyponyza's comment in Fluffypony Appreciation Thread
  8. 96 points: Same_As_It_Ever_Was's comment in [Moderation Announcement] Religion related posts are now considered off-topic and will be removed
  9. 94 points: Flenst's comment in Security Warning: CLI binaries available on getmonero.org may have been compromised at some point during the last 24h.
  10. 93 points: moneroh's comment in Name Monero 0.14!
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Dear Greg (and other Core developers)

Dear Greg (and other Core developers),
Your response is deeply worrying me, I've decided to stop being just a spectator and register to make a comment, I hope this will help you and Core in some way.
Let me just begin by stating that I've been a long time Core supporter.
When Core released a new version of their Bitcoin software, I knew there was a certain level of quality control as well as forward thinking, a certain level of trust. It is because of that trust that I've never even considered looking at other alternatives, until now.
As a general fan and user of digital currency, I have no allegiance to Core/BU/XT/Miners or who ever, I don't feel personally attached to any party, I am just interested in Bitcoin's general progress, how Bitcoin will change the world for the better and make people's lives easier. I am also a realist, that means I will only make judgment base on practical matters instead of some arbitrary ideal moral high ground. So, everything I am posting here will be as neutral as you can get from a Bitcoin user.
With that out of the way, I must say, what happened in the past few months have really begun to change my perspective on Core.
For example the current BU fiasco, my understanding is that, a year ago some miners wanted 8MB blocks, some wanted 4MB, there was the usual struggle and bargaining between users/miners/nodes/developers, eventually the miners made a compromise, the "Hong Kong Agreement" was made, in which miners agreed to support Segwit and a 2MB block size increase, Adam Back signed the agreement, only to have you call them "dipshits" and broke the agreement afterwards. Source.
Because of that, now, a year later, the block chain has reached the 1MB block size limit, there is a huge tx backlog and as a result the tx fee has sky rocketed, users are affected and many have moved their money to alt coins. The miners have no choice but to choose the other best options: Bitcoin Unlimited.
So how can anyone honestly blame the miners and BU at this point? Seriously, even if you're paid to do so, deep down you must know this crisis was coming a year ago, and it was Core's responsibility to prepare for it.
Core and some of its fans (some are obviously paid) keep repeating miners and BU are evil because they are splitting the chain, sure you can say that, but seriously, what did you expect them to do. They already compromised and was ignored, now there is a tx backlog, Bitcoin is losing ground to competitions, Core is sitting on their asses holding the code hostage, breaking agreements, making insults, what else are the miners supposed to do. What did Core expect them to do?
I am not even defending miners/BU here, it's all about the block size limit, I am using a pure practical pov: If BU didn't exist, miners would have switched to something else without the 1M limit, simple as that.
Anyone who keep pointing their fingers at miners/BU is just trying to ignore the fact that Core did nothing about the 1MB limit for years.
The thing that really irritates me though, is that the block size limit wasn't even in the white paper, so why would Core hold the code hostage and refuse to increase the limit from 1MB? 1MB is such a small number, how can you even justify not increasing it?
The fact is many Core developers were openly supporting block size increase, but then became strongly opposed to it after they started working for Blockstream, now I don't care for all the conspiracy theories, but can you people just come out and explain why the sudden change of heart?
I find that really puzzling, it's like watching people who used to love pizza, suddenly hate pizza after they work for McDonalds, it just doesn't make sense. Mind you these Core members didn't just simply change their taste, they went from openly supporting raising block size limit to openly hating it with a passion.
Every explanations I've read from Core in the past few months, can basically translate to: "Our Segwit and LN will be soooooo great, who cares what people actually need right now, stop talking to me, I don't care, I already know what you want, if you don't agree with me, you're just stupid."
If Segwit and LN is so great, it'll naturally be adopted when there is a real demand. Core already had the market share and user trust, they already have the golden goose, so why do they have to kill the goose just to get the Segwit golden egg?
Core kept chanting how great Segwit and LN are, it may be true, but their actions tell me they are really insecure about them, otherwise they wouldn't need to artificially create a crisis just to force everyone to use it, I don't know about you, but I believe actions always speak louder than words.
Satoshi saw this tx backlog coming when he was designing Bitcoin, the block size limit isn't even in the white paper, the 1MB limit was only a temporary measure to stop spam in the beginning.
Satoshi's white paper clearly states that consensus should be made base on CPU power, not the number of nodes or IP addresses, not the number of developers, not online poll ratings, not social media, not forum polls, just CPU power. Satoshi made this decision not because he trusted the miners, but because he expected everyone to be selfish and act on their own interests, and of all the pieces in the ecosystem, hash power is the most difficult to fake and come by.
Miners are constantly in an arm race, hash rate never stop climbing, in this constant zero sum survival of the fittest, they get nothing the moment they stop competing, eventually miners become so focused on competing with each other, fine tuning every last knob to gain an hash rate advantage.
Regardless of what anyone else is doing, miners are always at maximum greed under the highest pressure, like a piano wire.
And that is the beauty of the Bitcoin design: All miners worry about is turning electricity into profit, they don't even care who is running the show, they ignore everyone else equally, because no amount of sucking up to users or developers will help their hash rate, but, miners do care about the stability of the ecosystem, because their profit depends on it. Given a choice they'd rather not make any decision that may shake the grounds and risk their profit.
So, in a world full of greed, lies, mistrusts, secret schemes, accusations and back stabs, miner's indiscriminately pure and focused self serving nature makes them the perfect center of balance. When nothing is reliable and nobody can be trusted, the simplest and purest form of greed becomes the constant.
As a digital currency, having consensus base on hash rate is why Bitcoin succeeded while other digital currency failed.
Miners generally don't care about what anyone else is doing, unless some other part of the system did something really short sighted (read: stupid) to tip the balance, and that is EXACTLY what Core did, miners tried to make compromises but were ignored and insulted, now the back log is full, miners are simply reacting in self defense.
Anyone who still blames the miners at this point, simply don't understand Bitcoin and why it succeeded.
Regardless of what you think of BU or Segwit, from a development point of view, Core simply failed, it failed because it ignored user's immediate and practical needs. They sat on their fat asses for a year, making promises after promises on some ideal vision, while there is a huge tx backlog on ground floor.
There are good and responsible Core members, but unfortunately a lot of Core members, especially the loudest ones, seem to be focused on excuses, launching personal attacks, making empty promises, making threats, playing victims, while ignoring practical and immediate user needs.
Greg, you may have a big ego, but you're not Bill Gates, and Bitcoin Core is not Microsoft Windows, block chain technology is young and there are competitions, Bitcoin users are mostly early adopters, they are sharp and they like trying new things, you can't play Bill Gates and use Microsoft tactics and still expect to win.
It is true that you currently have some status and spot light, you have your financial backings, you have your crew and echo chamber, you have your side chain patents, from your pov it really looks like you can do whatever you want, insult people, ignore users, and nobody can do anything about it.
But, in this field anything can happen in a year, so many new and shiny things have come and gone.
Pride goes before a fall, Microsoft, AOL, Yahoo all spent billions and failed because they ignored their users. Blockstream only have $75 million, they already made a big mistake, but for some reason they're not turning around, instead acting even cockier than Microsoft.
Judging from how you ignored Satoshi's email and only arrive back to the scene years after Satoshi has gone. I have reason to believe you're the type of person that lacks intuitive foresight.
So I am going to give you an advice: You're on the wrong side of history, but you still have a chance to turn around.
You can't treat your users like they are idiots, they might not find out the truth the first day, they might be fooled by censoring tactics, but eventually there will be a crack, and once people find out you've been lying to them, the trust is gone forever, they'll never trust you again.
Look at the Iraq war, the so called WMD, look at Powell, there were massive misinformation campaign to push people to war, emotions were high, lies mixed with half truths were flying around, SJWs and useful idiots were screaming on top of their lungs, so many people were convinced there were 100% right.
But a decade later, everyone just remember Powell as the guy who lied on TV holding a bottle of white powder.
Where do you think you will be in 10 years, Greg?
Are you going to be remembered as someone who made Bitcoin better, or someone who missed the Bitcoin boat twice?
Bitcoin Core team, this is for you: You had your chance and you failed, no matter who you think you are, you're on the wrong side of history and I don't believe in you people anymore.
And before you try to point fingers and accusing me of helping a side, I am telling you, I don't care who wins, I am tired of your BS and I am going to ditch Bitcoins until things clear.
I am not going to risk my hard earned money on a bunch of short sighted arrogant insecure emotional lying pricks and bitches stuck with messiah complexes who scream a lot and talk big but can't solve simple and practical problems right in front of their noses and screw things up for everyone then turn around and play victims like some entitled pre-adolescent brat asking for a kick in the face.
That's all.
Alex
Source: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1842146.msg18335776#msg18335776
submitted by MobTwo to btc [link] [comments]

The cryptobubble is a symptom of more

The following article was written by Olav Dirkmaat, professor of economics at the University of Francisco Marroquín in Guatemala, and translator of the masterpiece Human Action by Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises in Dutch ('Human action'). He previously worked at both GoldRepublic and Nxchange. He is also a PhD candidate in economics at the Rey Juan Carlos University in Spain.
I would like to share these thoughts with the community. Not because I believe in them, but because there are some good arguments in the article and I think other viewing points to crypto will in the end make crypto win.
What are your thoughts about the article? (If you liked the discussion or the article, please vote me up. If you disliked the article, but think discussing crypto is a good thing, don't vote me down :P)
When there is an (artificial) economic expansion, driven by cheap credit and too low interest rates, we know that sooner or later things will go wrong. What we do not know is exactly how it goes wrong. We only know that - at artificially low interest rates - some ill investments are made in certain sectors. In the 1990s, it was (starting) internet companies, domain names and the NASDAQ. In the run-up to the 2008 crisis, it was predominantly house prices, (amateur) property speculators and mortgage lenders. And this time? Where do bubbles form?
We have previously discussed how - thanks to artificially low interest rates - equities are again overvalued, mainly technology companies. But also the recent craziness in the crypto coins can not be overlooked. In a few months Bitcoin rose to a record high of almost $ 20,000 dollars. Many crypto investors seemed to become dormant rich; even gold investors began to doubt why they were investing in precious metal and not the crypto-mired mists. While (in the 90s) some amateur speculators in domain names became very quickly very rich, this time amateur speculators get rich in crypto coins. Just like domain names then, crypto coins are now - unfortunately - the victims of speculative excesses.
Do you still doubt if crypto coins are in a bubble? Take the Dell share. Dell is a company that I invested in just before the acquisition by Michael Dell himself (and accomplices). Dell is a technology company whose stock price first scored less than a dollar but within a short time frame reached a record high of nearly $ 55 dollars per share. During the dotcom bubble, Dell was one of the many internet companies that achieved a billion dollar valuation.
THE DELL SHARE PRICE INCREASED RAPIDLY DURING THE DOTCOM BUBBLE AND COLLAPSED AGAIN LATER. ALTHOUGH DELL CERTAINLY HAD FUNDAMENTAL VALUE, THE PRICE WAS MUCH TOO HIGH. SOURCE: YAHOO FINANCE
Why do I call Dell? Very simple. Dell was (and is) a valuable company with products, customers, distribution channels and revenues. But the price paid in 2000 for a Dell share was simply excessive.
We must be very careful that we never mix price and value. And when we pay too much for something, even though it is valuable, it is not a sensible investment. Unfortunately, many crypto investors do not seem to have learned this ancient lesson.
I hope to have some credit with you. After all, I have been familiar with the crypto coins for years. Since 2013 I own a Bitcoin fraction and since 2014 I have nice amounts of Ripple (XRP). I still visited the cryptocongresses when only nerds and libertarians visited them, and men in suits were still absent. I will certainly not become the next Bitcoin millionaire, but I am more than familiar with the opportunities and limitations of this new technology. I even had the chance to spend time this year with Nick Szabo, a crypto veteran who already invented the forerunner of Bitcoin in 1998.
Although I am a fan of this technological revolution, I warn of a bubble. A bubble that even harms Bitcoin does not help. Bitcoin does not benefit from the current mania. And according to my conviction, even the biggest Bitcoin defender can not but admit that there is an enormous crypto soap bubble.
The most important quality of money is that it is a unit of account (a "unit of account" in English). And Bitcoin's current popularity is aggravating volatility rather than reducing volatility. Less volatility means a more stable unit of account. Note: the problem is not that there is "deflation" because the Bitcoin appreciates (rises in price). There is nothing wrong with that. Prices can adapt perfectly to a rising currency. Just like prices nowadays - as a rule - adapt perfectly to a falling currency (central banks aim at at least two percent annual inflation which eats away the purchasing power of our money). The problem is that the price of a Bitcoin is far too unstable to ever be money or a unit of account. The following joke shows immediately what the problem is:
FREELY TRANSLATED: A SON ASKS ONE BITCOIN FOR HIS BIRTHDAY TO HIS IN-BITCOIN-INVESTING FATHER. HIS FATHER IS OUTRAGED: WHAT ?! $ 15,554 ??? $ 14.354 IS A LOT OF MONEY! WHAT DO YOU NEED $ 16,782 FOR?
We are talking about day volatility here. The bitcoin price can increase or decrease by ten to twenty percent in question, something that would be exceptional in the precious metal market, for example in the case of the gold price. The current speculation and buying drive of a larger, largely ignorant public - only makes the bitcoin price more unstable. The volatility is getting worse, not better. The question is whether the introduction of forward contracts (futures) can change this. Last weeks, bitcoinfutures were introduced on both the CME and the Cboe. According to the theory, a forward market reduces price volatility, but it remains to be seen who has the stomach to resist the volatility of bitcoin prices. If we currently look at the liquidity on these bitcoin futures markets and the number of contracts traded, then the conclusion is that these futures markets (unlike other raw materials) will not solve Bitcoin's volatility problem.
Some Bitcoin supporters, however, still believe that Bitcoin is not a bubble. They want to silence "doom-thinkers". The Bitcoin has, according to them, absolute value in a world full of fiat money. Admittedly, our current financial system is very fragile and has enough problems. But that does not mean that Bitcoin is valuable. Bitcoin has the problem that it is too volatile to actually serve as a currency or an effective means of exchange. This does not matter in some contexts (take Venezuela, where capital controls are a reality and the currency, the Venezuelan Bolivar, is as unstable as Bitcoin itself), but in the context of developed countries such as the Netherlands or the United States, it does. Moreover, Bitcoin seems to be losing its own success, given the enormous waiting times and the huge transaction costs (lastly, a Bitcoin transaction cost about thirty dollars).
And who is currently buying Bitcoin to use it as money? The answer is: nobody. There are only investors who buy it in the hope of selling it later (and the term is getting shorter and shorter). The only "real" transaction that takes place are investors who have already made a good profit and want to "cash out" a part by exchanging these for gold, goods or real estate. Okay, nobody is perhaps exaggerated: there is a limited group of Chinese (and Venezuelans / Nigerians) who want to circumvent capital controls in their countries and find a way to get money out of the country. But that is really not enough for the current price of well over $ 10,000.
Then there is the argument that the question will first be speculative, with the origin of investors hoping to earn a profit by buying Bitcoin well before that moment. This question would "stabilize" the price and reduce volatility over time. However, the evidence seems to point the other way at the moment. Even though the current Bitcoin price would be justified by fundamentals, there is still a cryptobubble. But even then, if we accept the above arguments for the sake of simplicity and pretend that Bitcoin already has a lot of fundamental value (that is, it is used as a means of exchange), even the biggest Bitcoin defenders have to admit that there is a cryptobubble.
Why? The reason is simple. Bitcoin is not the only crypto coin. And that while there is a strong "winner takes all" effect in the money industry. A coin has value because many people want it and actually use it. A dominant currency therefore quickly has a large market share. Take for example the dollar and the euro, the two largest coins in the world, also the most liquid coins in the world. But the same principle also applies in cryptoland. We can never use five hundred different coins; no fiat coins nor crypto coins.
So how can someone explain that there are more than a hundred cryptocurrences with a valuation of more than one hundred million dollars? And how can it be explained that there are more than five hundred crypto coins with a valuation of one million or more? If Bitcoin really were so valuable, and there is no question of a cryptobubble, then the Bitcoin price would be followed by at most some complementary coins (Ether, Ripple?), But certainly not by hundreds of other competing crypto coins. Let alone that these, predominantly worthless, crypto coins earn millions valuations. In other words, if someone wants to dismiss a cryptobubble by stating that the current Bitcoin price is justified by the fundamental value and usefulness of Bitcoin, then surely that does not apply to the 500+ other crypto coins?
The cryptobubble can not be denied. This is one for the history books. This chapter in monetary history will probably go down in the books as the cryptobubble. At the next crisis, investors will enter the boat again. Make sure you do not let yourself be led by the issues of the day. As a gold investor, do not be fooled by friends and family who seem to double their money every week. Patience pays off, as always, on the stock market. It is about the long term, not the short term. And gambling is not investing.
The cryptobubble is accompanied by a huge bubble elsewhere: mainly the stock market and large parts of the bond market. The current zero interest rates are destroying markets. And as I said earlier, we do not know in advance where the soap bubbles form, just that bubbles form. But now we know that one of those soap bubbles is the cryptobubble.
submitted by Ekua to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BlackCoin Projects Overview

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IMPORTANT: COMMUNITY HELP REQUIRED

Help to get added to major exchanges - BTC-E, Bitfinex...
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BlackCast

** NEXT DATE TBA
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PROJECTS as of 2014/08/19

overview of current projects
  1. Proof-of-Stake 2.0/PoS 2.0
  2. BitHalo/BlackHalo - decentralized exchange, smart contracts and more
  3. Custom Wallet with anonymity functions and much more development
  4. Android Wallet
  5. BlackCoin-centric exchange development
  6. HowToBuyBlackCoin - Guides for "normal people"
  7. BlackCoinPool Translation/Localization
  8. Project BlackNote - BlackCoin ATM - FUNIDING FINISHED!
  9. Project BlackBean - BlackCoin Machines
  10. CryoBit BlackCoin Cards - ORDER NOW!
  11. Max Borges Agency needs your input - Crowdsourcing
  12. Make BC popular in Asia and middle East
  13. Project BlackCoin Legacy - Advertize BC in games
  14. CRYPTOMACHINES - BlackCoin Hardware Crowdfunding
  15. BlackCoin Summit 2015
  16. BlackWave Labs project announced
  17. Project BlackMoon
major projects/achievements (improvements going on)
Links
  1. BlackCoinTalk Project Forums
  2. DailyBlackCoin - News Source
  3. FollowTheCoin - BC-related Articles from McKie on a regular basis
  4. BlackCoinFoundation - Projects, Fundraising etc.
PLEASE NOTE
I know this is not (yet) a complete list. If you know something that is missing, please add a comment and i will add it to the listings.
PLEASE DO NOT DISCUSS the single topics here, i will remove such posts, thanks.
submitted by Subtuppel to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Blowing the lid off the CryptoNote/Bytecoin scam (with the exception of Monero) - Reformatted for Reddit

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
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Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
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See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
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May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
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pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
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This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

World History Timeline of Events Leading up to Bitcoin - In the Making

A (live/editable) timeline of historical events directly or indirectly related to the creation of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies
*still workin' on this so check back later and more will be added, if you have any suggested dates/events feel free to lemme know...
This timeline includes dates pertaining to:
Ancient Bartering – first recorded in Egypt (resources, services...) – doesn’t scale
Tally sticks were used, making notches in bones or wood, as a form of money of account
9000-6000 BC Livestock considered the first form of currency
c3200 BC Clay tablets used in Uruk (Iraq) for accounting (believed to be the earliest form of writing)
3000 BC Grain is used as a currency, measured out in Shekels
3000 BC Banking developed in Mesopotamia
3000 BC? Punches used to stamp symbols on coins were a precursor to the printing press and modern coins
? BC Since ancient Persia and all the way up until the invention and expansion of the telegraph Homing Pigeons were used to carry messages
2000 BC Merchants in Assyria, India and Sumeria lent grain to farmers and traders as a precursor to banks
1700 BC In Babylon at the time of Hammurabi, in the 18th century BC, there are records of loans made by the priests of the temple.
1200 BC Shell money first used in China
1000-600 BC Crude metal coins first appear in China
640 BC Precious metal coins – Gold & Silver first used in ancient Lydia and coastal Greek cities featuring face to face heads of a bull and a lion – first official minted currency made from electrum, a mixture of gold and silver
600-500 BC Atbash Cipher
A substitution Cipher used by ancient Hebrew scholars mapping the alphabet in reverse, for example, in English an A would be a Z, B a Y etc.
400 BC Skytale used by Sparta
474 BC Hundreds of gold coins from this era were discovered in Rome in 2018
350 BC Greek hydraulic semaphore system, an optical communication system developed by Aeneas Tacticus.
c200 BC Polybius Square
??? Wealthy stored coins in temples, where priests also lent them out
??? Rome was the first to create banking institutions apart from temples
118 BC First banknote in the form of 1 foot sq pieces of white deerskin
100-1 AD Caesar Cipher
193 Aureus, a gold coin of ancient Rome, minted by Septimius Severus
324 Solidus, pure gold coin, minted under Constantine’s rule, lasted until the late 8th century
600s Paper currency first developed in Tang Dynasty China during the 7th century, although true paper money did not appear until the 11th century, during the Song Dynasty, 960–1279
c757–796 Silver pennies based on the Roman denarius became the staple coin of Mercia in Great Britain around the time of King Offa
806 First paper banknotes used in China but isn’t widely accepted in China until 960
1024 The first series of standard government notes were issued in 1024 with denominations like 1 guàn (貫, or 700 wén), 1 mín (緡, or 1000 wén), up to 10 guàn. In 1039 only banknotes of 5 guàn and 10 guàn were issued, and in 1068 a denomination of 1 guàn was introduced which became forty percent of all circulating Jiaozi banknotes.
1040 The first movable type printer was invented in China and made of porcelain
? Some of the earliest forms of long distance communication were drums used by Native Africans and smoke signals used by Native Americans and Chinese
1088 Movable type in Song Dynasty China
1120 By the 1120s the central government officially stepped in and produced their own state-issued paper money (using woodblock printing)
1150 The Knights Templar issued bank notes to pilgrims. Pilgrims deposited their valuables with a local Templar preceptory before embarking, received a document indicating the value of their deposit, then used that document upon arrival in the Holy Land to retrieve their funds in an amount of treasure of equal value.
1200s-1300s During the 13th century bankers from north Italy, collectively known as Lombards, gradually replace the Jews in their traditional role as money-lenders to the rich and powerful. – Florence, Venice and Genoa - The Bardi and Peruzzi Families dominated banking in 14th century Florence, establishing branches in many other parts of Europe
1200 By the time Marco Polo visited China they’d move from coins to paper money, who introduced the concept to Europe. An inscription warned, "All counterfeiters will be decapitated." Before the use of paper, the Chinese used coins that were circular, with a rectangular hole in the middle. Several coins could be strung together on a rope. Merchants in China, if they became rich enough, found that their strings of coins were too heavy to carry around easily. To solve this problem, coins were often left with a trustworthy person, and the merchant was given a slip of paper recording how much money they had with that person. Marco Polo's account of paper money during the Yuan Dynasty is the subject of a chapter of his book, The Travels of Marco Polo, titled "How the Great Kaan Causeth the Bark of Trees, Made Into Something Like Paper, to Pass for Money All Over his Country."
1252 Florin minted in Florence, becomes the hard currency of its day helping Florence thrive economically
1340 Double-entry bookkeeping - The clerk keeping the accounts for the Genoese firm of Massari painstakingly fills in the ledger for the year 1340.
1397 Medici Bank established
1450 Johannes Gutenberg builds the printing press – printed words no longer just for the rich
1455 Paper money disappears from China
1466 Polyalphabetic Cipher
1466 Rotating cipher disks – Vatican – greatest crypto invention in 1000 yrs – the first system to challenge frequency analysis
1466 First known mechanical cipher machine
1472 The oldest bank still in existence founded, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena, headquartered in Siena, Italy
1494 Double-entry bookkeeping system codified by Luca Pacioli
1535 Wampum, a form of currency used by Native Americans, a string of beads made from clamshells, is first document.
1553 Vigenere Cipher
1557 Phillip II of Spain managed to burden his kingdom with so much debt (as the result of several pointless wars) that he caused the world's first national bankruptcy — as well as the world's second, third and fourth, in rapid succession.
1577 Newspaper in Korea
1586 The Babington Plot
1590 Cabinet Noir was established in France. Its mission was to open, read and reseal letters, and great expertise was developed in the restoration of broken seals. In the knowledge that mail was being opened, correspondents began to develop systems to encrypt and decrypt their letters. The breaking of these codes gave birth to modern systematic scientific code breaking.
1600s Promissory banknotes began in London
1600s By the early 17th century banking begins also to exist in its modern sense - as a commercial service for customers rather than kings. – Late 17th century we see cheques slowly gains acceptance
The total of the money left on deposit by a bank's customers is a large sum, only a fraction of which is usually required for withdrawals. A proportion of the rest can be lent out at interest, bringing profit to the bank. When the customers later come to realize this hidden value of their unused funds, the bank's profit becomes the difference between the rates of interest paid to depositors and demanded from debtors.
The transformation from moneylenders into private banks is a gradual one during the 17th and 18th centuries. In England it is achieved by various families of goldsmiths who early in the period accept money on deposit purely for safe-keeping. Then they begin to lend some of it out. Finally, by the 18th century, they make banking their business in place of their original craft as goldsmiths.
1605 Newspaper in Straussburg
c1627 Great Cipher
1637 Wampum is declared as legal tender in the U.S. (where we got the slang word “clams” for money)
1656 Johan Palmstruch establishes the Stockholm Banco
1661 Paper Currency reappears in Europe, soon became common - The goldsmith-bankers of London began to give out the receipts as payable to the bearer of the document rather than the original depositor
1661 Palmstruch issues credit notes which can be exchanged, on presentation to his bank, for a stated number of silver coins
1666 Stockholms Banco, the predecessor to the Central Bank of Sweden issues the first paper money in Europe. Soon went bankrupt for printing too much money.
1667 He issues more notes than his bank can afford to redeem with silver and winds up in disgrace, facing a death penalty (commuted to imprisonment) for fraud.
1668 Bank of Sweden – today the 2nd oldest surviving bank
1694 First Central Bank established in the UK was the first bank to initiate the permanent issue of banknotes
Served as model for most modern central banks.
The modern banknote rests on the assumption that money is determined by a social and legal consensus. A gold coin's value is simply a reflection of the supply and demand mechanism of a society exchanging goods in a free market, as opposed to stemming from any intrinsic property of the metal. By the late 17th century, this new conceptual outlook helped to stimulate the issue of banknotes.
1700s Throughout the commercially energetic 18th century there are frequent further experiments with bank notes - deriving from a recognized need to expand the currency supply beyond the availability of precious metals.
1710 Physiocracy
1712 First commercial steam engine
1717 Master of the Royal Mint Sir Isaac Newton established a new mint ratio between silver and gold that had the effect of driving silver out of circulation (bimetalism) and putting Britain on a gold standard.
1735 Classical Economics – markets regulate themselves when free of intervention
1744 Mayer Amschel Rothschild, Founder of the Rothschild Banking Empire, is Born in Frankfurt, Germany
Mayer Amschel Rothschild extended his banking empire across Europe by carefully placing his five sons in key positions. They set up banks in Frankfurt, Vienna, London, Naples, and Paris. By the mid 1800’s they dominated the banking industry, lending to governments around the world and people such as the Vanderbilts, Carnegies, and Cecil Rhodes.
1745 There was a gradual move toward the issuance of fixed denomination notes in England standardized printed notes ranging from £20 to £1,000 were being printed.
1748 First recorded use of the word buck for a dollar, stemming from the Colonial period in America when buck skins were commonly traded
1757 Colonial Scrip Issued in US
1760s Mayer Amschel Rothschild establishes his banking business
1769 First steam powered car
1775-1938 US Diplomatic Codes & Ciphers by Ralph E Weber used – problems were security and distribution
1776 American Independence
1776 Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand theory helped bankers and money-lenders limit government interference in the banking sector
1781 The Bank of North America was a private bank first adopted created the US Nation's first de facto central bank. When shares in the bank were sold to the public, the Bank of North America became the country's first initial public offering. It lasted less than ten years.
1783 First steamboat
1791 Congress Creates the First US Bank – A Private Company, Partly Owned by Foreigners – to Handle the Financial Needs of the New Central Government. First Bank of the United States, a National bank, chartered for a term of twenty years, it was not renewed in 1811.
Previously, the 13 states had their own banks, currencies and financial institutions, which had an average lifespan of about 5 years.
1792 First optical telegraph invented where towers with telescopes were dispersed across France 12-25 km apart, relaying signals according to positions of arms extended from the top of the towers.
1795 Thomas Jefferson invents the Jefferson Disk Cipher or Wheel Cipher
1797 to 1821 Restriction Period by England of trading banknotes for silver during Napoleonic Wars
1797 Currency Crisis
Although the Bank was originally a private institution, by the end of the 18th century it was increasingly being regarded as a public authority with civic responsibility toward the upkeep of a healthy financial system.
1799 First paper machine
1800 Banque de France – France’s central bank opens to try to improve financing of the war
1800 Invention of the battery
1801 Rotchschild Dynasty begins in Frankfurt, Holy Roman Empire – established international banking family through his 5 sons who established themselves in London, Paris, Frankfurt, Vienna, and Naples
1804 Steam locomotive
1807 Internal combustion engine and automobile
1807 Robert Fulton expands water transportation and trade with the workable steamboat.
1809 Telegraphy
1811 First powered printing press, also first to use a cylinder
1816 The Privately Owned Second Bank of the US was Chartered – It Served as the Main Depository for Government Revenue, Making it a Highly Profitable Bank – charter not renewed in 1836
1816 The first working telegraph was built using static electricity
1816 Gold becomes the official standard of value in England
1820 Industrial Revolution
c1820 Neoclassical Economics
1821 British gov introduces the gold standard - With governments issuing the bank notes, the inherent danger is no longer bankruptcy but inflation.
1822 Charles Babbage, considered the "father of the computer", begins building the first programmable mechanical computer.
1832 Andrew Jackson Campaigns Against the 2nd Bank of the US and Vetoes Bank Charter Renewal
Andrew Jackson was skeptical of the central banking system and believed it gave too few men too much power and caused inflation. He was also a proponent of gold and silver and an outspoken opponent of the 2nd National Bank. The Charter expired in 1836.
1833 President Jackson Issues Executive Order to Stop Depositing Government Funds Into Bank of US
By September 1833, government funds were being deposited into state chartered banks.
1833-1837 Manufactured “boom” created by central bankers – money supply Increases 84%, Spurred by the 2nd Bank of the US
The total money supply rose from $150 million to $267 million
1835 Jackson Escapes Assassination. Assassin misfired twice.
1837-1862 The “Free Banking Era” there was no formal central bank in the US, and banks issued their own notes again
1838 First Telegram sent using Morse Code across 3 km, in 1844 he sent a message across 71 km from Washington DC to Baltimore.
1843 Ada Lovelace published the first algorithm for computing
1844 Modern central bank of England established - meaning only the central bank of England could issue banknotes – prior to that commercial banks could issue their own and were the primary form of currency throughout England
the Bank of England was restricted to issue new banknotes only if they were 100% backed by gold or up to £14 million in government debt.
1848 Communist Manifesto
1850 The first undersea telegraphic communications cable connected France in England after latex produced from the sap of the Palaquium gutta tree in 1845 was proposed as insulation for the underwater cables.
1852 Many countries in Europe build telegram networks, however post remained the primary means of communication to distant countries.
1855 In England fully printed notes that did not require the name of the payee and the cashier's signature first appeared
1855 The printing telegraph made it possible for a machine with 26 alphabetic keys to print the messages automatically and was soon adopted worldwide.
1856 Belgian engineer Charles Bourseul proposed telephony
1856 The Atlantic Telegraph company was formed in London to stretch a commercial telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean, completed in 1866.
1860 The Pony Express was founded, able to deliver mail of wealthy individuals or government officials from coast to coast in 10 days.
1861 The East coast was connected to the West when Western Union completed the transcontinental telegraph line, putting an end to unprofitable The Pony Express.
1862-1863 First US banknotes - Lincoln Over Rules Debt-Based Money and Issues Greenbacks to Fund Civil War
Bankers would only lend the government money under certain conditions and at high interest rates, so Lincoln issued his own currency – “greenbacks” – through the US Treasury, and made them legal tender. His soldiers went on to win the war, followed by great economic expansion.
1863 to 1932 “National Banking Era” Commercial banks in the United States had legally issued banknotes before there was a national currency; however, these became subject to government authorization from 1863 to 1932
1864 Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen founded the first rural credit union in Heddesdorf (now part of Neuwied) in Germany. By the time of Raiffeisen's death in 1888, credit unions had spread to Italy, France, the Netherlands, England, Austria, and other nations
1870 Long-distance telegraph lines connected Britain and India.
c1871 Marginalism - The doctrines of marginalism and the Marginal Revolution are often interpreted as a response to the rise of the worker's movement, Marxian economics and the earlier (Ricardian) socialist theories of the exploitation of labour.
1871 Carl Menger’s Principles of Economics – Austrian School
1872 Marx’s Das Capital
1872 Australia becomes the first nation to be connected to the rest of the world via submarine telegraph cables.
1876 Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone, first called the electric speech machine – revolutionized communication
1877 Thomas Edison – Phonograph
1878 Western Union, the leading telegraph provider of the U.S., begins to lose out to the telephone technology of the National Bell Telephone Company.
1881 President James Garfield, Staunch Proponent of “Honest Money” Backed by Gold and Silver, was Assassinated
Garfield opposed fiat currency (money that was not backed by any physical object). He had the second shortest Presidency in history.
1882 First description of the one-time pad
1886 First gas powered car
1888 Ballpoint pen
1892 Cinematograph
1895 System of wireless communication using radio waves
1896 First successful intercontinental telegram
1898 Polyethylene
1899 Nickel-cadmium battery
1907 Banking Panic of 1907
The New York Stock Exchange dropped dramatically as everyone tried to get their money out of the banks at the same time across the nation. This banking panic spurred debate for banking reform. JP Morgan and others gathered to create an image of concern and stability in the face of the panic, which eventually led to the formation of the Federal Reserve. The founders of the Federal Reserve pretended like the bankers were opposed to the idea of its formation in order to mislead the public into believing that the Federal Reserve would help to regulate bankers when in fact it really gave even more power to private bankers, but in a less transparent way.
1908 St Mary’s Bank – first credit union in US
1908 JP Morgan Associate and Rockefeller Relative Nelson Aldrich Heads New National Monetary Commission
Senate Republican leader, Nelson Aldrich, heads the new National Monetary Commission that was created to study the cause of the banking panic. Aldrich had close ties with J.P. Morgan and his daughter married John D. Rockefeller.
1910 Bankers Meet Secretly on Jekyll Island to Draft Federal Reserve Banking Legislation
Over the course of a week, some of the nation’s most powerful bankers met secretly off the coast of Georgia, drafting a proposal for a private Central Banking system.
1913 Federal Reserve Act Passed
Two days before Christmas, while many members of Congress were away on vacation, the Federal Reserve Act was passed, creating the Central banking system we have today, originally with gold backed Federal Reserve Notes. It was based on the Aldrich plan drafted on Jekyll Island and gave private bankers supreme authority over the economy. They are now able to create money out of nothing (and loan it out at interest), make decisions without government approval, and control the amount of money in circulation.
1913 Income tax established -16th Amendment Ratified
Taxes ensured that citizens would cover the payment of debt due to the Central Bank, the Federal Reserve, which was also created in 1913.The 16th Amendment stated: “The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.”
1914 November, Federal Reserve Banks Open
JP Morgan and Co. Profits from Financing both sides of War and Purchasing Weapons
J.P. Morgan and Co. made a deal with the Bank of England to give them a monopoly on underwriting war bonds for the UK and France. They also invested in the suppliers of war equipment to Britain and France.
1914 WWI
1917 Teletype cipher
1917 The one-time pad
1917 Zimmerman Telegram intercepted and decoded by Room 40, the cryptanalysis department of the British Military during WWI.
1918 GB returns to gold standard post-war but it didn’t work out
1919 First rotor machine, an electro-mechanical stream ciphering and decrypting machine.
1919 Founding of The Cipher Bureau, Poland’s intelligence and cryptography agency.
1919-1929 The Black Chamber, a forerunner of the NSA, was the first U.S. cryptanalytic organization. Worked with the telegraph company Western Union to illegally acquire foreign communications of foreign embassies and representatives. It was shut down in 1929 as funding was removed after it was deemed unethical to intercept private domestic radio signals.
1920s Department stores, hotel chains and service staions begin offering customers charge cards
1921-1929 The “Roaring 20’s” – The Federal Reserve Floods the Economy with Cash and Credit
From 1921 to 1929 the Federal Reserve increased the money supply by $28 billion, almost a 62% increase over an eight-year period.[3] This artificially created another “boom”.
1927 Quartz clock
1928 First experimental Television broadcast in the US.
1929 Federal Reserve Contracts the Money Supply
In 1929, the Federal Reserve began to pull money out of circulation as loans were paid back. They created a “bust” which was inevitable after issuing so much credit in the years before. The Federal Reserve’s actions triggered the banking crisis, which led to the Great Depression.
1929 October 24, “Black Thursday”, Stock Market Crash
The most devastating stock market crash in history. Billions of dollars in value were consolidated into the private banker’s hands at the expense of everyone else.
1930s The Great Depression marked the end of the gold standard
1931 German Enigma machines attained and reconstructed.
1932 Turbo jet engine patented
1933 SEC founded - passed the Glass–Steagall Act, which separated investment banking and commercial banking. This was to avoid more risky investment banking activities from ever again causing commercial bank failures.
1933 FM Radio
1933 Germany begins Telex, a network of teleprinters sending and receiving text based messages. Post WWII Telex networks began to spread around the world.
1936 Austrian engineer Paul Eisler invented Printed circuit board
1936 Beginning of the Keynesian Revolution
1937 Typex, British encryption machines which were upgraded versions of Enigma machines.
1906 Teletypewriters
1927 Founding of highly secret and unofficial Signal Intelligence Service, SIS, the U.S. Army’s codebreaking division.
1937 Made illegal for Americans to own gold
1938 Z1 built by Konrad Zuse is the first freely programmable computer in the world.
1939 WWII – decline of the gold standard which greatly restricted policy making
1939-45 Codetalkers - The Navajo code is the only spoken military code never to have been deciphered - "Were it not for the Navajos, the Marines would never have taken Iwo Jima."—Howard Connor
1940 Modems
1942 Deciphering Japanese coded messages leads to a turning point victory for the U.S. in WWII.
1943 At Bletchley Park, Alan Turing and team build a specialized cipher-breaking machine called Heath Robinson.
1943 Colossus computer built in London to crack the German Lorenz cipher.
1944 Bretton Woods – convenient after the US had most of the gold
1945 Manhattan Project – Atom Bomb
1945 Transatlantic telephone cable
1945 Claude E. Shannon published "A mathematical theory of cryptography", commonly accepted as the starting point for development of modern cryptography.
C1946 Crypto Wars begin and last to this day
1946 Charg-it card created by John C Biggins
1948 Atomic clock
1948 Claude Shannon writes a paper that establishes the mathematical basis of information theory
1949 Info theorist Claude Shannon asks “What does an ideal cipher look like?” – one time pad – what if the keys are not truly random
1950 First credit card released by the Diners Club, able to be used in 20 restaurants in NYC
1951 NSA, National Security Agency founded and creates the KL-7, an off-line rotor encryption machine
1952 First thermonuclear weapon
1953 First videotape recorder
1953 Term “Hash” first used meaning to “chop” or “make a mess” out of something
1954 Atomic Energy Act (no mention of crypto)
1957 The NSA begins producing ROMOLUS encryption machines, soon to be used by NATO
1957 First PC – IBM
1957 First Satellite – Sputnik 1
1958 Western Union begins building a nationwide Telex network in the U.S.
1960s Machine readable codes were added to the bottom of cheques in MICR format, which speeded up the clearing and sorting process
1960s Financial organizations were beginning to require strong commercial encryption on the rapidly growing field of wired money transfer.
1961 Electronic clock
1963 June 4, Kennedy Issued an Executive Order (11110) that Authorized the US Treasury to Issue Silver Certificates, Threatening the Federal Reserve’s Monopoly on Money
This government issued currency would bypass the governments need to borrow from bankers at interest.
1963 Electronic calculator
1963 Nov. 22, Kennedy Assassinated
1963 Johnson Reverses Kennedy’s Banking Rule and Restores Power to the Federal Reserve
1964 8-Track
1964 LAN, Local Area Networks adapters
1965 Moore’s Law by CEO of Intel Gordon Moore observes that the number of components per integrated circuit doubles every year, and projected this rate of growth would continue for at least another decade. In 1975 he revised it to every two years.
1967 First ATM installed at Barclay’s Bank in London
1968 Cassette Player introduced
1969 First connections of ARPANET, predecessor of the internet, are made. started – SF, SB, UCLA, Utah (now Darpa) – made to stay ahead of the Soviets – there were other networks being built around the world but it was very hard to connect them – CERN in Europe
1970s Stagflation – unemployment + inflation, which Keynesian theory could not explain
1970s Business/commercial applications for Crypto emerge – prior to this time it was militarily used – ATMs 1st got people thinking about commercial applications of cryptography – data being sent over telephone lines
1970s The public developments of the 1970s broke the near monopoly on high quality cryptography held by government organizations.
Use of checks increased in 70s – bringing about ACH
One way functions...
A few companies began selling access to private networks – but weren’t allowed to connect to the internet – business and universities using Arpanet had no commercial traffic – internet was used for research, not for commerce or advertising
1970 Railroads threatened by the growing popularity of air travel. Penn Central Railroad declares bankruptcy resulting in a $3.2 billion bailout
1970 Conjugate coding used in an attempt to design “money physically impossible to counterfeit”
1971 The US officially removes the gold standard
1971 Email invented
1971 Email
1971 First microcomputer on a chip
1971 Lockheed Bailout - $1.4 billion – Lockheed was a major government defense contractor
1972 First programmable word processor
1972 First video game console
1973 SWIFT established
1973 Ethernet invented, standardized in ‘83
1973 Mobile phone
1973 First commercial GUI – Xerox Alto
1973 First touchscreen
1973 Emails made up more than ¾ of ARPANET’s packets – people had to keep a map of the network by their desk – so DNS was created
1974 A protocol for packet network intercommunication – TCP/IP – Cerf and Kahn
1974 Franklin National Bank Bailout - $1.5 billion (valued at that time) - At the time, it was the largest bank failure in US history
1975 New York City Bailout - $9.4 billion – NYC was overextended
1975 W DES - meant that commercial uses of high quality encryption would become common, and serious problems of export control began to arise.
1975 DES, Data Encryption Standard developed at IBM, seeking to develop secure electronic communications for banks and large financial organizations. DES was the first publicly accessible cipher to be 'blessed' by a national agency such as the NSA. Its release stimulated an explosion of public and academic interest in cryptography.
1975 Digital camera
1975 Altair 8800 sparks the microprocessor revolution
1976 Bretton Woods ratified (lasted 30 years) – by 80’s all nations were using floating currencies
1976 New Directions in Cryptography published by Diffie & Hellman – this terrified Fort Meade – previously this technique was classified, now it’s public
1976 Apple I Computer – Steve Wozniak
1976 Asymmetric key cryptosystem published by Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.
1976 Hellman and Diffie publish New Directions in Cryptography, introducing a radically new method of distributing cryptographic keys, contributing much to solving key distribution one of the fundamental problems of cryptography. It brought about the almost immediate public development of asymmetric key algorithms. - where people can have 2 sets of keys, public and private
1977 Diffie & Hellman receive letter from NSA employee JA Meyer that they’re violating Federal Laws comparable to arms export – this raises the question, “Can the gov prevent academics from publishing on crypto?
1977 DES considered insecure
1977 First handheld electronic game
1977 RSA public key encryption invented
1978 McEliece Cryptosystem invented, first asymmetric encryption algorithm to use randomization in the encryption process
1980s Large data centers began being built to store files and give users a better faster experience – companies rented space from them - Data centers would not only store data but scour it to show people what they might want to see and in some cases, sell data
1980s Reaganomics and Thatcherism
1980 A decade of intense bank failures begins; the FDIC reports that 1,600 were either closed or received financial assistance from 1980 to 1994
1980 Chrysler Bailout – lost over $1 billion due to major hubris on the part of its executives - $1.5 billion one of the largest payouts ever made to a single corporation.
1980 Protocols for public key cryptosystems – Ralph Merkle
1980 Flash memory invented – public in ‘84
1981 “Untraceable Electronic Mail, Return Addresses and Digital Pseudonumns” – Chaum
1981 EFTPOS, Electronic funds transfer at point of sale is created
1981 IBM Personal Computer
1982 “The Ethics of Liberty” Murray Rothbard
1982 Commodore 64
1982 CD
1983 Satellite TV
1983 First built in hard drive
1983 C++
1983 Stereolithography
1983 Blind signatures for untraceable payments
Mid 1980s Use of ATMs becomes more widespread
1984 Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust bailed out due to overly aggressive lending styles and - the bank’s downfall could be directly traced to risk taking and a lack of due diligence on the part of bank officers - $9.5 billion in 2008 money
1984 Macintosh Computer - the first mass-market personal computer that featured a graphical user interface, built-in screen and mouse
1984 CD Rom
1985 Zero-Knowledge Proofs first proposed
1985 300,000 simultaneous telephone conversations over single optical fiber
1985 Elliptic Curve Cryptography
1987 ARPANET had connected over 20k guarded computers by this time
1988 First private networks email servers connected to NSFNET
1988 The Crypto Anarchists Manifesto – Timothy C May
1988 ISDN, Integrated Services Digital Network
1989 Savings & Loan Bailout - After the widespread failure of savings and loan institutions, President George H. W. Bush signed and Congress enacted the Financial Institutions Reform Recovery and Enforcement Act - This was a taxpayer bailout of about $200 billion
1989 First commercial emails sent
1989 Digicash - Chaum
1989 Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau built the prototype system which became the World Wide Web, WWW
1989 First ISPs – companies with no network of their own which connected people to a local network and to the internet - To connect to a network your computer placed a phone call through a modem which translated analog signals to digital signals – dial-up was used to connect computers as phone lines already had an extensive network across the U.S. – but phone lines weren’t designed for high pitched sounds that could change fast to transmit large amounts of data
1990s Cryptowars really heat up...
1990s Some countries started to change their laws to allow "truncation"
1990s Encryption export controls became a matter of public concern with the introduction of the personal computer. Phil Zimmermann's PGP cryptosystem and its distribution on the Internet in 1991 was the first major 'individual level' challenge to controls on export of cryptography. The growth of electronic commerce in the 1990s created additional pressure for reduced restrictions.[3] Shortly afterward, Netscape's SSL technology was widely adopted as a method for protecting credit card transactions using public key cryptography.
1990 NSFNET replaced Arpanet as backbone of the internet with more than 500k users
Early 90s Dial up provided through AOL and Compuserve
People were leery to use credit cards on the internet
1991 How to time-stamp a digital doc - Stornetta
1991 Phil Zimmermann releases the public key encryption program Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) along with its source code, which quickly appears on the Internet. He distributed a freeware version of PGP when he felt threatened by legislation then under consideration by the US Government that would require backdoors to be included in all cryptographic products developed within the US. Expanded the market to include anyone wanting to use cryptography on a personal computer (before only military, governments, large corporations)
1991 WWW (Tim Berners Lee) – made public in ‘93 – flatten the “tree” structure of the internet using hypertext – reason for HTTP//:WWW – LATER HTTPS for more security
1992 Erwise – first Internet Browser w a graphical Interface
1992 Congress passed a law allowing for commercial traffic on NSFNET
1992 Cpherpunks, Eric Hughes, Tim C May and John Gilmore – online privacy and safety from gov – cypherpunks write code so it can be spread and not shut down (in my earlier chapter)
1993 Mosaic – popularized surfing the web ‘til Netscape Navigator in ’94 – whose code was later used in Firefox
1993 A Cypherpunks Manifesto – Eric Hughes
1994 World’s first online cyberbank, First Virtual, opened for business
1994 Bluetooth
1994 First DVD player
1994 Stanford Federal Credit Union becomes the first financial institution to offer online internet banking services to all of its members in October 1994
1994 Internet only used by a few
1994 Cybercash
1994 Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption protocol released by Netscape. Making financial transactions possible.
1994 One of the first online purchases was made, a Pizza Hut pepperoni pizza with mushrooms and extra cheese
1994 Cyphernomicon published – social implication where gov can’t do anything about it
1994-1999 Social Networking – GeoCities (combining creators and users) – had 19M users by ’99 – 3rd most popular after AOL and Yahoo – GeoCities purchased by Yahoo for $3.6B but took a hit after dotcom bubble popped and never recovered – GC shut down in ‘99
1995-2000 Dotcom bubble – Google, Amazon, Facebook: get over 600M visitors/year
1995 DVD
1995 MP3 term coined for MP3 files, the earlier development of which stretches back into the ‘70s, where MP files themselves where developed throughout the ‘90s
1995 NSFNET shut down and handed everything over to the ISPs
1995 NSA publishes the SHA1 hash algorithm as part of its Digital Signature Standard.
1996, 2000 President Bill Clinton signing the Executive order 13026 transferring the commercial encryption from the Munition List to the Commerce Control List. This order permitted the United States Department of Commerce to implement rules that greatly simplified the export of proprietary and open source software containing cryptography, which they did in 2000 - The successful cracking of DES likely helped gather both political and technical support for more advanced encryption in the hands of ordinary citizens - NSA considers AES strong enough to protect information classified at the Top Secret level
1996 e-gold
1997 WAP, Wireless Access Point
1997 NSA researchers published how to mint e cash
1997 Adam Back – HashCash – used PoW – coins could only be used once
1997 Nick Szabo – smart contracts “Formalizing and Securing Relationships on Public Networks”
1998 OSS, Open-source software Initiative Founded
1998 Wei Dai – B-money – decentralized database to record txs
1998 Bitgold
1998 First backdoor created by hackers from Cult of the Dead Cow
1998 Musk and Thiel founded PayPal
1998 Nick Szabo says crypto can protect land titles even if thugs take it by force – said it could be done with a timestamped database
1999 Much of the Glass-Steagal Act repealed - this saw US retail banks embark on big rounds of mergers and acquisitions and also engage in investment banking activities.
1999 Milton Friedman says, “I think that the Internet is going to be one of the major forces for reducing the role of government. The one thing that's missing, but that will soon be developed, is a reliable e-cash - a method whereby on the Internet you can transfer funds from A to B without A knowing B or B knowing A.”
1999 European banks began offering mobile banking with the first smartphones
1999 The Financial Services Modernization Act Allows Banks to Grow Even Larger
Many economists and politicians have recognized that this legislation played a key part in the subprime mortgage crisis of 2007.
1999-2001 Napster, P2P file sharing – was one of the fastest growing businesses in history – bankrupt for paying musicians for copyright infringement

submitted by crypto_jedi_ninja to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dear Greg (and other Core developers)

Dear Greg (and other Core developers),
Your response is deeply worrying me, I've decided to stop being just a spectator and register to make a comment, I hope this will help you and Core in some way.
Let me just begin by stating that I've been a long time Core supporter.
When Core released a new version of their Bitcoin software, I knew there was a certain level of quality control as well as forward thinking, a certain level of trust. It is because of that trust that I've never even considered looking at other alternatives, until now.
As a general fan and user of digital currency, I have no allegiance to Core/BU/XT/Miners or who ever, I don't feel personally attached to any party, I am just interested in Bitcoin's general progress, how Bitcoin will change the world for the better and make people's lives easier. I am also a realist, that means I will only make judgment base on practical matters instead of some arbitrary ideal moral high ground. So, everything I am posting here will be as neutral as you can get from a Bitcoin user.
With that out of the way, I must say, what happened in the past few months have really begun to change my perspective on Core.
For example the current BU fiasco, my understanding is that, a year ago some miners wanted 8MB blocks, some wanted 4MB, there was the usual struggle and bargaining between users/miners/nodes/developers, eventually the miners made a compromise, the "Hong Kong Agreement" was made, in which miners agreed to support Segwit and a 2MB block size increase, Adam Back signed the agreement, only to have you call them "dipshits" and broke the agreement afterwards. Source.
Because of that, now, a year later, the block chain has reached the 1MB block size limit, there is a huge tx backlog and as a result the tx fee has sky rocketed, users are affected and many have moved their money to alt coins. The miners have no choice but to choose the other best options: Bitcoin Unlimited.
So how can anyone honestly blame the miners and BU at this point? Seriously, even if you're paid to do so, deep down you must know this crisis was coming a year ago, and it was Core's responsibility to prepare for it.
Core and some of its fans (some are obviously paid) keep repeating miners and BU are evil because they are splitting the chain, sure you can say that, but seriously, what did you expect them to do. They already compromised and was ignored, now there is a tx backlog, Bitcoin is losing ground to competitions, Core is sitting on their asses holding the code hostage, breaking agreements, making insults, what else are the miners supposed to do. What did Core expect them to do?
I am not even defending miners/BU here, it's all about the block size limit, I am using a pure practical pov: If BU didn't exist, miners would have switched to something else without the 1M limit, simple as that.
Anyone who keep pointing their fingers at miners/BU is just trying to ignore the fact that Core did nothing about the 1MB limit for years.
The thing that really irritates me though, is that the block size limit wasn't even in the white paper, so why would Core hold the code hostage and refuse to increase the limit from 1MB? 1MB is such a small number, how can you even justify not increasing it?
The fact is many Core developers were openly supporting block size increase, but then became strongly opposed to it after they started working for Blockstream, now I don't care for all the conspiracy theories, but can you people just come out and explain why the sudden change of heart?
I find that really puzzling, it's like watching people who used to love pizza, suddenly hate pizza after they work for McDonalds, it just doesn't make sense. Mind you these Core members didn't just simply change their taste, they went from openly supporting raising block size limit to openly hating it with a passion.
Every explanations I've read from Core in the past few months, can basically translate to: "Our Segwit and LN will be soooooo great, who cares what people actually need right now, stop talking to me, I don't care, I already know what you want, if you don't agree with me, you're just stupid."
If Segwit and LN is so great, it'll naturally be adopted when there is a real demand. Core already had the market share and user trust, they already have the golden goose, so why do they have to kill the goose just to get the Segwit golden egg?
Core kept chanting how great Segwit and LN are, it may be true, but their actions tell me they are really insecure about them, otherwise they wouldn't need to artificially create a crisis just to force everyone to use it, I don't know about you, but I believe actions always speak louder than words.
Satoshi saw this tx backlog coming when he was designing Bitcoin, the block size limit isn't even in the white paper, the 1MB limit was only a temporary measure to stop spam in the beginning.
Satoshi's white paper clearly states that consensus should be made base on CPU power, not the number of nodes or IP addresses, not the number of developers, not online poll ratings, not social media, not forum polls, just CPU power. Satoshi made this decision not because he trusted the miners, but because he expected everyone to be selfish and act on their own interests, and of all the pieces in the ecosystem, hash power is the most difficult to fake and come by.
Miners are constantly in an arm race, hash rate never stop climbing, in this constant zero sum survival of the fittest, they get nothing the moment they stop competing, eventually miners become so focused on competing with each other, fine tuning every last knob to gain an hash rate advantage.
Regardless of what anyone else is doing, miners are always at maximum greed under the highest pressure, like a piano wire.
And that is the beauty of the Bitcoin design: All miners worry about is turning electricity into profit, they don't even care who is running the show, they ignore everyone else equally, because no amount of sucking up to users or developers will help their hash rate, but, miners do care about the stability of the ecosystem, because their profit depends on it. Given a choice they'd rather not make any decision that may shake the grounds and risk their profit.
So, in a world full of greed, lies, mistrusts, secret schemes, accusations and back stabs, miner's indiscriminately pure and focused self serving nature makes them the perfect center of balance. When nothing is reliable and nobody can be trusted, the simplest and purest form of greed becomes the constant.
As a digital currency, having consensus base on hash rate is why Bitcoin succeeded while other digital currency failed.
Miners generally don't care about what anyone else is doing, unless some other part of the system did something really short sighted (read: stupid) to tip the balance, and that is EXACTLY what Core did, miners tried to make compromises but were ignored and insulted, now the back log is full, miners are simply reacting in self defense.
Anyone who still blames the miners at this point, simply don't understand Bitcoin and why it succeeded.
Regardless of what you think of BU or Segwit, from a development point of view, Core simply failed, it failed because it ignored user's immediate and practical needs. They sat on their fat asses for a year, making promises after promises on some ideal vision, while there is a huge tx backlog on ground floor.
There are good and responsible Core members, but unfortunately a lot of Core members, especially the loudest ones, seem to be focused on excuses, launching personal attacks, making empty promises, making threats, playing victims, while ignoring practical and immediate user needs.
Greg, you may have a big ego, but you're not Bill Gates, and Bitcoin Core is not Microsoft Windows, block chain technology is young and there are competitions, Bitcoin users are mostly early adopters, they are sharp and they like trying new things, you can't play Bill Gates and use Microsoft tactics and still expect to win.
It is true that you currently have some status and spot light, you have your financial backings, you have your crew and echo chamber, you have your side chain patents, from your pov it really looks like you can do whatever you want, insult people, ignore users, and nobody can do anything about it.
But, in this field anything can happen in a year, so many new and shiny things have come and gone.
Pride goes before a fall, Microsoft, AOL, Yahoo all spent billions and failed because they ignored their users. Blockstream only have $75 million, they already made a big mistake, but for some reason they're not turning around, instead acting even cockier than Microsoft.
Judging from how you ignored Satoshi's email and only arrive back to the scene years after Satoshi has gone. I have reason to believe you're the type of person that lacks intuitive foresight.
So I am going to give you an advice: You're on the wrong side of history, but you still have a chance to turn around.
You can't treat your users like they are idiots, they might not find out the truth the first day, they might be fooled by censoring tactics, but eventually there will be a crack, and once people find out you've been lying to them, the trust is gone forever, they'll never trust you again.
Look at the Iraq war, the so called WMD, look at Powell, there were massive misinformation campaign to push people to war, emotions were high, lies mixed with half truths were flying around, SJWs and useful idiots were screaming on top of their lungs, so many people were convinced there were 100% right.
But a decade later, everyone just remember Powell as the guy who lied on TV holding a bottle of white powder.
Where do you think you will be in 10 years, Greg?
Are you going to be remembered as someone who made Bitcoin better, or someone who missed the Bitcoin boat twice?
Bitcoin Core team, this is for you: You had your chance and you failed, no matter who you think you are, you're on the wrong side of history and I don't believe in you people anymore.
And before you try to point fingers and accusing me of helping a side, I am telling you, I don't care who wins, I am tired of your BS and I am going to ditch Bitcoins until things clear.
I am not going to risk my hard earned money on a bunch of short sighted arrogant insecure emotional lying pricks and bitches stuck with messiah complexes who scream a lot and talk big but can't solve simple and practical problems right in front of their noses and screw things up for everyone then turn around and play victims like some entitled pre-adolescent brat asking for a kick in the face.
That's all.
Alex
submitted by MobTwo to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Turning Taiwan's largest electronic sound festival into a virtual currency application lab...

Turning Taiwan's largest electronic sound festival into a virtual currency application lab...
Quick and dirty translation of the recent ULTRA Festival article on Yahoo Mobile (China) - linked below...
https://preview.redd.it/64psurff93m11.png?width=1160&format=png&auto=webp&s=78b4bab7db4f9e09dd7c01ef762688c32553969f
Fireworks, dry ice, screams, the second weekend of September, Taipei Dajia Riverside Park gathered tens of thousands of people, they are the fans of the world's largest electronic music party Ultra Music Festival (hereinafter referred to as Ultra). After many years of hard work, this grand event originated from Miami, Florida, was officially held in Taiwan for the first time. It not only brought the world's top 100 DJ lineups, the US officially designed luxury stage, but also a large number of overseas fans.
The rock and roll men and women in the party held a color card in their hands, and the transactions of the 39 stall vendors on the spot were completed by it. Surprisingly, this card called X Pass is not the new Taiwanese currency, but the virtual currency U coin developed for the event with the blockchain concept. Let the original focus on the ultrasound. Suddenly added one more identity - the world's largest blockchain application laboratory.
The protagonist of this experiment is the founder of the Southeast Asian blockchain company Pundi X, a 35-year-old Malaysian Chinese, Zac Cheah.
In the popular blockchain industry, most people want to profit from the issuance and trading of virtual currency. However, he rarely invests in the application and puts the funds raised into hardware. "What I hope to solve is the real trading of virtual currency. The question." Xie Zibin further explained, "I want to be a blockchain version of Visa, so that people can easily buy things in virtual currency in their daily lives."
He raised 1.1 billion yuan for machine-built money , and nearly four times the market value of his own virtual currency.
Xie Zibin's Pundi X launched ICO (Initial Coin Offering) at the beginning of this year, and launched a virtual currency code-named NPXS. The funds raised will be 100,000 XPOS, just like Visa's credit card machine, which is made around the world. Virtual currency can be consumed and applied in real life, and it is no longer just a "currency" that is invisible in the cloud.
Investors who participate in the Fundi X fundraising can get the virtual currency NPXS, which is also the conversion currency used to operate all virtual currency transactions on XPOS, which is the medium of trading.
Unexpectedly, this concept raised $35 million (about NT$1.1 billion) in 90 minutes, and rushed into the top 10 ICOs in the world.
Long-term focus on the blockchain industry source Platinum Capital Executive Changhu said that although the ICO frenzy has raised more than a billion dollars in the world since the ICO frenzy, "but from the perspective of a single startup, ICO can get it. $35 million, this is definitely a lot of money."
According to the virtual currency quote website CoinMarketCap, the market value of Bitcoin has shrunk by more than 60% since the beginning of this year, but the market value of NPXS has grown nearly four times against the trend, reaching US$170 million (about NT$5.3 billion) and entering the world. The top 50 list of virtual currency market capitalization.
Why is the price of NPXS continuing to rise? Xie Zibin said that because it is a virtual currency with real use scenarios, it can continue to create so much demand and value. In this regard, Hu Day agreed, "In the big bear market where the virtual currency is turbulent, it can still maintain the rise, I believe the market has given the answer."
Born in Malaysia, from the Xiao Nian Chinese Language School, Xie Zibin from the Institute of Studies in Sweden and Norway, joined the World Wide Web inventor Bernard. Lee's W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) promotes the new web page specification HTML5.
Fighting for Differentiation" won the hardware of the top 100 Microsoft high-level cooperation coin circle, no one is playing, he is alone
He recalled that in 2010, the specifications of the web pages used by people were the hegemony of the overlord. The two strong ones were: Flash controlled by a Adobe company, and HTML thought by a number of companies. In the same year, Xie Zibin served as the promotion chairman of the latter in China. "That experience has influenced me a lot. The design of HTML follows the "consensus decision". Everyone has to vote for a thing to develop."
As it became the global mainstream step by step, Xie Zibin deeply realized that the open source is greater than the monopoly spirit, and the blockchain technology with "decentralization" as the core value became his first choice when starting a business.
David Ben Kay, former China's former legal chief, has run a new incubator in Beijing. "I have met many entrepreneurs. Those geniuses have a vision, but there are not many people who can listen to others. Zac There are a few who have ideals and abilities, but they remain open." He also mentioned that Xie Zibin insisted on being a blockchain product that everyone can use in his life. He is from the director of Ethereum, Microsoft China Law Chief, etc. At the time of his retirement, he nodded as an important reason for the Pundi X legal chief.
However, even if it is put into the blockchain application, there are still many options, most of which can be solved by writing code. Why does Xie Zibin have to go to Shenzhen, China to find a factory to do hardware? "The first wave of people coming in is a soft body, and the homogenization is very serious. You see no one in the top 100." Xie Zibin said, "But I think the blockchain is definitely not the only way!" Give the industry a different spark, let Xie Zibin embark on a more twisted but wonderful road than others.
Benefit sharing, tandem three-party people provide low-cost machines to attract merchants to join
What is special about this XPOS?
At first glance, it is no different from the POS (point-of-sales intelligence system) machine in the general store, but it is a clever way to benefit three-party users: consumers, businesses, and blockchain developers. Wen Ruo-ting, vice president of Pundi X, stated, “Consumers who use XPOS to pay or purchase virtual currency only need to pay 1% more fees, which is more cost-effective than traditional 5% (virtual currency) exchanges. At the same time, merchants earn more than this. The handling fee will increase the profit."
In addition to guests and stores, XPOS also hopes to be the underlying platform for blockchain developers, allowing different developers to develop their own applications on this machine. Huang Pu, the technology chief of Pundi X, said that its technology can help other blockchain applications reduce development costs. For example, BusinessWeek can issue "Business Week" in XPOS, and can also develop applications such as smart contracts subscribed to by magazines. It is a revolution in the blockchain world."
As for the business model, Pundi X does not rely on this machine to make money, but provides merchants at a very low price, so that it can quickly expand globally, and the main income comes from the distribution.
Qiu Yujia, CEO of the EMBA of the University of Political Science and Technology, said that the Pundi X is in line with the three elements of the new economy towards the user era: the use of technology, the experience of being king, and multiple roles. "Especially the third point of "multiple roles", this POS becomes a platform for customers, businesses, and companies interested in developing applications to serve each other. Compared with traditional POS, it has more roles as a splicer and aggregator. I think There is potential." There are not enough users of the Challenge to educate the market and seize the market. However, after all, the top 100 people in the currency circle are nowhere to go, and the difficulties faced by Pundi X are more challenging.
Wang Mengdie, founder of China's blockchain media "Star Daily", said at a summit that the biggest problem in the blockchain industry is that there are no users, only investors and speculators. Therefore, just as if no one used a credit card, Visa's machines were designed to be better, faster, and useless. How much demand for virtual currency transactions will grow in the next few years is a test that Pundi X can't avoid.
Even if the market for virtual currency real transactions can really expand, Hu Day pointed out that, like the large exchange ICE recently to cooperate with Starbucks to pay for virtual currency, XPOS coverage is fast enough to compete with these giants.
In addition, virtual currency has the unpredictable nature of the ups and downs. Wang Zhide, founder of Bitu, a virtual currency exchange, evaluated the experience of establishing a blockchain incubator in Shibuya. "The currency price fluctuation is too large. "Not strong," he said. "In the long run, he thinks, "When the blockchain industry develops, it will definitely be necessary for the market to solve the pain of real payment."
Xie Zibin also understands that the success or failure of Pundi X depends on the needs of real trading, and the education market and market share are the top priorities. At present, XPOS has received 25,000 orders, and he hopes to reach the target of 100,000 units in three years. In addition, in order to expand the use of ethnic groups, it is expected that another hardware product will be launched by the end of this year, extending the same concept from the merchant to the consumer.
Although the road ahead is not clear, Xie Zibin, who has decided to use the consensus and applied, has already verified his charm by the virtual currency market. The number of the Pundi X team has grown by more than 100 people in just two years. "I don't want to play speculative games. Blockchain has more possibilities than speculative coins." The blockchain enters human life and realizes that it no longer relies on the financial transactions of financial institutions. It is the moment to truly develop and take off. This road When will it be achieved? Xie Zibin’s entrepreneurial direction is the beginning.
Born: 1982
Education: Master of Information Security, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Master of Computer Computing, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
: W3C China HTML5 Group Founder, Opera Software China Network Technology Standards Director
: Pundi X Founder and CEO
Original:https://tw.mobi.yahoo.com/news/%E4%BB%96%E6%8A%8A%E5%8F%B0%E7%81%A3%E6%9C%80%E5%A4%A7%E9%9B%BB%E9%9F%B3%E8%B6%B4-%E8%AE%8A%E8%99%9B%E5%B9%A3%E6%87%89%E7%94%A8%E5%AF%A6%E9%A9%97%E5%A0%B4-095957332.html



submitted by crypt0hodl1 to PundiX [link] [comments]

Beginner's Guide to Exchanges - Part 2

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 2

A little late, but as promised here is Part 2 of the Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges. I would like to sincerely thank everyone for their support and feedback in making these.
Link to Part 1
This time I also made a Google Docs survey in the hopes of sharing the results with the community. I thought we could share what we use as a whole and why redditors choose the exchanges they do. For skeptics (as you all should be), I assure you that I am not collecting personal information. This is for recreation and if you are still wary, then by all means abstain!
Link to Survey
In Part 3 I will be wrapping up this series by covering decentralized, semi-decentralized, and derivative exchanges. Here it goes!

00 – Concepts and Definitions (Continued)

04 – Fiat Exchanges – Canada

QuadrigaCX

Country Linked Bank Transfer Wire Transfer Paypal Credit/Debit Crypto Transfer
CAD Deposit 1%/ Withdraw Free Free Free (Withdraw Only) 1% (Withdraw Only) Free
USD - Free Free (Withdraw Only) - Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
Fiat .5% .5%
BTC/ETH .2% .2%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator or Email 2FA Available
Wallet Security Undisclosed amount of funds in cold storage
Web Security 3rd Party Security provided by CloudFlare
Bug Bounty Expired $50 bounties
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info Credit Score Limits
Basic Account X X Digital only, Limits Vary
Verified Account X X X X X X Limits Vary

05 – Fiat Exchanges – Europe

CEX.IO

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Crypto Transfer
Europe 3.5%+ €0.24 Deposit €0 / Withdraw €25 (SEPA €10) Free
Russia 5% + ₽ 15.57 - -
UK 3.5%+ £0.20 Deposit £0 / Withdraw £20 (SEPA Free
US 3.5%+ $0.25 Deposit $0 / Withdraw $50 Deposit $0 / Withdraw 1%
Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies 0% .20%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security Undisclosed amount of funds in cold storage
Credit Card Data Overseen by 3rd Party Kyte Consultants
Web Security SSL Certificates and Encrypted Personal Data
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address ID + Photo Bank Info KYC Limits
Basic Account X X X Digital only
Verified Account X X X X X X $10,000 Daily/$100,000 Monthly

BTC-E / XBTC-E

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Paypal
Europe - SEPA - Deposit .5% / Withdraw 1% (€100 min) -
Russia 6% 6% -
US 7% Deposit .5% ($20 min) / Withdraw 1% ($100 min) 7%
Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .20% .20%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Password Expiration Must be changed every 6 months
DDoS Protection 3rd Party Security Services provided by CloudFlare
Bug Bounty Yes at xBTCe
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Verified User X X X X X No Stated Limits

Liqui.io

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Digital Currencies 0.1% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Bug Bounty Reported bounty posted on HackerOne (unconfirmed)

06 – Fiat Exchanges – South Korea

안녕하세요 여러분! 혹시 우리 한국인 친구 이 보고서를 한국어로 읽고 싶어한다면 알려주세요. 관심이 많이 있다면 간단한 한국어 보고서도 만들 수 있습니다. This year, ETH has taken off like a rocket in the Land of the Morning Calm. With a population of just 50 million, South Koreans account for almost 30% of daily ETH trade volume. Even more surprising is that currently the daily volume of ETH is about 5 times higher than that of Bitcoin on Korean exchanges. Since demand is high, ETH is trading at a premium on Korean exchanges. Some users have been talking about capitalizing off this imbalance by trading on arbitrage between exchanges. For those who have no connection to Korea and hope to do so, I have bad news – all Korean exchanges require a National ID number and access to a Korean bank account. This makes Korean exchanges virtually closed to Korean nationals and those with long-term visas. Sorry everyone.

Bithumb

Coinone

Korbit

07 – Fiat Exchanges – China

With a great deal of anticipation, major Chinese exchanges started trading ETH this summer. Since these exchanges deal huge volumes of Bitcoin already, naturally it was expected that they invest heavily into ETH as well. So far this hasn’t quite lived up to the hype with many exchanges still favoring Bitcoin, Litecoin, Altcoins, and even Ethereum Classic (Gulp). Three of these exchanges underwent inspections by the Peoples Bank of China earlier this year and will be working closely with the government to ease fears of money laundering and market manipulation. There are a lot of Chinese sites, and since my Chinese is non-existent this list is basically just for name recognition. In many ways these sites are very similar in regards to security, verification, and fees compared to their western counterparts; just marketed at a different audience and currency. If users are seriously interested in these exchanges and making reviews, please contribute or ask!

OK Coin

Huobi

CH-BTC

Yunbi

08 – Coinswaps & Cryto-converters

ShapeShift

Changelly

submitted by poop_dragon to ethtrader [link] [comments]

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